STIGQter STIGQter: STIG Summary: Oracle Database 11.2g Security Technical Implementation Guide Version: 1 Release: 17 Benchmark Date: 24 Jan 2020: The DBMS must support organizational requirements to enforce password complexity by the number of upper-case characters used.

DISA Rule

SV-66491r1_rule

Vulnerability Number

V-52275

Group Title

SRG-APP-000166-DB-000070

Rule Version

O112-C2-014100

Severity

CAT II

CCI(s)

Weight

10

Fix Recommendation

If all user accounts are authenticated by the OS or an enterprise-level authentication/access mechanism, and not by Oracle, no fix to the DBMS is required.

If any user accounts are managed by Oracle: Develop, test and implement a password verification function that enforces DoD requirements.

(Oracle supplies a sample function called verify_function_11G, in the script file
<oracle_home>/RDBMS/ADMIN/utlpwdmg.sql. This can be used as the starting point for a customized function.)

Check Contents

If all user accounts are authenticated by the OS or an enterprise-level authentication/access mechanism, and not by Oracle, stop here: this is not a finding against the DBMS.

For each profile that can be applied to accounts where authentication is under Oracle's control, determine the password verification function, if any, that is in use:

SELECT * FROM SYS.DBA_PROFILES
WHERE RESOURCE_NAME = 'PASSWORD_VERIFY_FUNCTION'
[AND PROFILE NOT IN (<list of non-applicable profiles>)]
ORDER BY PROFILE;
Bearing in mind that a profile can inherit from another profile, and the root profile is called DEFAULT, determine the name of the password verification function effective for each profile.

If, for any profile, the function name is null, this is a finding.

For each password verification function, examine its source code. If it does not enforce the organization-defined minimum number of upper-case characters (1 unless otherwise specified), this is a finding.

Vulnerability Number

V-52275

Documentable

False

Rule Version

O112-C2-014100

Severity Override Guidance

If all user accounts are authenticated by the OS or an enterprise-level authentication/access mechanism, and not by Oracle, stop here: this is not a finding against the DBMS.

For each profile that can be applied to accounts where authentication is under Oracle's control, determine the password verification function, if any, that is in use:

SELECT * FROM SYS.DBA_PROFILES
WHERE RESOURCE_NAME = 'PASSWORD_VERIFY_FUNCTION'
[AND PROFILE NOT IN (<list of non-applicable profiles>)]
ORDER BY PROFILE;
Bearing in mind that a profile can inherit from another profile, and the root profile is called DEFAULT, determine the name of the password verification function effective for each profile.

If, for any profile, the function name is null, this is a finding.

For each password verification function, examine its source code. If it does not enforce the organization-defined minimum number of upper-case characters (1 unless otherwise specified), this is a finding.

Check Content Reference

M

Target Key

2669

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